I buy books like they read themselves…

booksThere are two things that I find almost impossible to resist at the shops: Shoes and books.

I’ve had to be stern with myself about the shoe thing. I’ve learnt (I think) to stop buying shoes that are so uncomfortable that I can’t walk in them (even if they are, oh-so-pretty) and I’ve learnt that there are only so many pairs of shoes that you can wear in one year.

The book thing, though, I still struggle with. When I was young I read a lot about children at the turn of the century who saw books as rare treasures, and I think that contributed to my love of them. There is something so precious and alive about a good book. A childhood book can stay with you forever like nothing else can. (I am of course talking about real books here. Don’t even get me started on E-books!)

Suffice to say, I have a large book collection and recently I had to pause and take stock. How many books have I bought on a passionate whim and never read? As I counted them up, I realized there are quite a few. Many of them, still on my ‘to be read’ list are pictured above.

So I’m going to try to stop buying for a while, until I’ve actually read what I have!

Do you have a stack of books that you ‘just had to have’ at the time, but that you haven’t read yet? What are they?

‘Mummy Porn’ and Thinking You’d Have Known the World was Round.

Ian-Somerhalder-Fifty-Shades-Of-Grey

Since Fifty Shades of Grey we have seen an explosion in the acceptance and embrace of what has become known as ‘mummy porn.’

Followers would like to see this as a feminist sexual revolution. I was reading an article in the SA Weekend Magazine, in which they interviewed Holly Hill, author of The Velvet Pouch, which has been labeled as daring, controversial and risqué.

Ms. Hill rejoices that “eBooks have provided three main things: anonymous purchase, closet-enabled reading – no one knows if you are looking at porn or algebra notes and eBooks also cost less. That means that people can afford more risky – and risqué- reading material.”

She’s hoping that her book will “help more women realize that the girl with the slutty clothes or the gorgeous sex worker or the flirtatious secretary isn’t the enemy, rather she is a celebration of our gender and part of our repressed selves.”

While I found these comments appalling and completely misguided as to what is actually healthy both for women and society, the real kicker was that she compared herself and her followers to those who believed that the world was round when everyone else was saying it was flat.

Seriously? Far too many people these days are claiming that their ‘revolution’ (which in reality is the equivalent of promoting that the world is triangular) is akin to the great awakening and discovery that the world was round.

Revolutions don’t always mean progression or discovery of truth. Just look at history.