Feminist Movie Checklist

Olhos fataisWhether we like it or not, the media plays a big role in setting and propagating what is considered normal.

We become so used to these portrayals of ‘normal’ that we rarely think to question it. When asked to question, however, we may be shocked at what we find.

A few months back, a friend introduced me to the ‘Feminist Movie Checklist.’ I’ll admit, the word ‘feminist’ made me skeptical from the start, but when we began discussing it, I was shocked to discover the extent of the stereotyping of women in film. Not just some films, but the vast majority of film.

Here’s the checklist. It’s nothing fancy. In fact, you’re just looking for one thing:

How many movies can you think of that have a scene, of ten seconds or more, in which there are no men, and in which two or more women are conversing on a topic other than men?

Think about it. You might be surprised.

Surprised by the fact that no one seems to care what women think on topics other than love and relationships?

Surprised that people only want to watch women in relation to men?

Surprised that we don’t even notice the discrepancy?

Next time you watch a movie, look for that ten-second clip. In the whole 120 minutes, you’ll be lucky to find one.

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Chivalry Didn’t Die at the Hand of a Man

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIt has long been said that chivalry is dead and I wonder, if this is true, who killed it?

I’ve come to the conclusion that it’s not because men in every city decided that they’d be happier just being jerks. Nope, the first stabs in chivalry’s back came from women who decided they’d be happier being treated like men.

Before I get an onslaught of anger over issues of equality and gender stereotypes, let me say this.: I’m all for equality, but I’m also all for difference. In centuries gone by, chivalry was a man’s way of respecting and honouring this distinction. It was not about his right to exert power; it was about her privilege of receiving service.

For centuries men and women have existed in a harmonious dance of give and take, each serving each other, until (dare I say) the women decided they wanted to do everything themselves. Goodness knows why they’ve felt a sudden need to open their own doors (no-one ever doubted you were capable of it) but somehow it seemed necessary as they hurtled past equality towards power and dominance, leaving emasculated men in their wake.

For the record, I don’t think chivalry is dead (though it is languishing under the pressure of decades of slow strangulation) and I commend the men who uphold it, but I would say this to the women who are lamenting its rarity: Before you cry in disgust that chivalry is dead, make sure you’re acting like a lady.