The Holiday Glut

cupcake_21006126Why do we love to do what is not good for us?

This will be my second Christmas without sugar, and this year I won’t even miss it. I am not tempted at all by chocolate or candy canes or puddings or tarts. My body has learned to see it all as a poison and my mind has followed suit.

But I’m not off the hook. I’m a glutton for other things. As soon as my holidays start my careful health sustaining routine goes out the window. I stay up late and sleep as long as I want. I forget to exercise and I eat when I feel like it, and lo and behold, within two weeks I’m feeling pretty average.

The word gluttony is usually associated with food, but I wonder if I could define it as the excessive consumption of what feels good over what is good? If so, holidays are a prime time for it.

I’ve really been challenged on this. Holidays give us a great chance to relax and let our hair down, but they’re not a time to let our glutinous feelings take over.

This Christmas, let’s remember to honour God with out bodies. Just because we can do it or just because we have the excuse to do it, doesn’t mean we should.

 

Wishing you all a lovely Christmas celebrating the birth of Jesus and a happy, healthy holiday.

A few things you shouldn’t say to skinny girls…

Do you find this topic surprising? Read on.

I come from a thin family; tall and thin. People would say I’m lucky, and I am, but it took me until my mid 20’s to believe it. Before that, if I could have changed anything about my physical appearance, I probably would have chosen to be fatter.

The world seems to assume that if a woman is thin, she has chosen it. While remarking on most women’s weight is a social taboo, thin women seem to be fair game.

What goes unnoticed is the emotional-verbal baggage that girls like myself have accrued.

I have never had an eating disorder, nor desired to be thin, but growing up, I received a multitude of personal barbs:

‘Oh my gosh! You’re so thin!’stock.xchng2

‘There’s nothing to you.’

‘You’re so scrawny.’

‘You’re a stick.’

‘I’d hate to be as thin as you.’

‘You’re so skinny it’s disgusting.’

‘You’re gonna fade away.’

‘Do you even eat?’

Approaching adulthood as a size 6-8 (US 2-4), I felt abnormal and unattractive to men.

While I have overcome many of these insecurities, it doesn’t mean that people’s comments have stopped.

Just last week, my sister had a client stop her at work and say, ‘Wow, you’re so thin! I bet your husband wishes you’d put on weight so you were more cuddly!’

Thin girls are people too.

As a rule of thumb: if you wouldn’t say it to an overweight person, don’t say it to an underweight one.