Feminist Movie Checklist

Olhos fataisWhether we like it or not, the media plays a big role in setting and propagating what is considered normal.

We become so used to these portrayals of ‘normal’ that we rarely think to question it. When asked to question, however, we may be shocked at what we find.

A few months back, a friend introduced me to the ‘Feminist Movie Checklist.’ I’ll admit, the word ‘feminist’ made me skeptical from the start, but when we began discussing it, I was shocked to discover the extent of the stereotyping of women in film. Not just some films, but the vast majority of film.

Here’s the checklist. It’s nothing fancy. In fact, you’re just looking for one thing:

How many movies can you think of that have a scene, of ten seconds or more, in which there are no men, and in which two or more women are conversing on a topic other than men?

Think about it. You might be surprised.

Surprised by the fact that no one seems to care what women think on topics other than love and relationships?

Surprised that people only want to watch women in relation to men?

Surprised that we don’t even notice the discrepancy?

Next time you watch a movie, look for that ten-second clip. In the whole 120 minutes, you’ll be lucky to find one.

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What Happens After the Movie Ends?

stockvault-glamour-portrait132357Ever wonder what happens after the movie ends?

After My Best Friend’s Wedding did Julia Roberts go on to discover that she’d only imagined herself in love with her best friend for a few days when she couldn’t have him, and that after the wedding all died down, she remembered why they’d been ‘just friends?’

After Kathleen sacrificed her store, did she and Joe really settle down beneath the canopy of  ‘Big bad Fox Books’ and live happily ever after? Was neither tempted, in the monotony of life, to find someone new and exciting on the internet who may offer them, oh so romantically, a bouquet of newly sharpened pencils?

Did Frodo settle down and have a family and reminisce, on occasion, of that great journey which had once seemed so epic, and yet now was merely the questionably exaggerated tale of an old Hobbit?

Did the film end just in time when Will and April were reunited in Definitely Maybe, before we could see that another month would prove the relationship impossible?

The world of film seems so fantastic. Our lives are so far removed from the romantic, exciting and engaging plots of the screen… or are they?

 In reality the Hollywood scripts are often not so different from our own. It’s just that our own lives carry on, after the final curtain, and we get to see what happens after the movie ends.