Christians don’t steal music (bless them)

I was listening to the radio the other day and they were discussing how times have changed with music. You know how the ladies who do the school pick up shift aimed at 35-year-old mums like to harp on about ‘back in the day?’ Yeah.

They were talking about vinyls and how so and so’s teenage daughter has never even bought any music, like, ever because all she does is stream it.

record-shop-2-1558936I was listening with only half-baked interest until one of the ‘voices’ (sounded like Meshel Laurie) said, ‘you know, the only people who are actually buying music these days are old people and Christians.’

She went on to say that the only people in the music business who are really making any money anymore are the old school people (because their fans don’t know how to stream music) and people like Guy Sebastian. He’s making a killing (apparently) because he’s got a lot of Christian fans and ‘Christians won’t steal music… (bless them.)’

Sure there was a slightly patronising edge to her tone, but I did find it interesting that it was an acknowledgeable phenomena. I know that a lot of non-Christians don’t steal music, and sadly, a lot of Christians probably do, but I have to say, that in that moment, when a woman who makes her livelihood in the media industry acknowledged that the Christians were holding up the integrity of the music business… well I was pretty proud of my people.

Advertisements

Things I’ve learned from killing consumerism #13 – We want beauty for ourselves

girl-shooting_385-19321008

I’ve been thinking about why it is that I used to shop so much, when I’m actually completely fine without it. It’s as though I had this consumer instinct inside me that just needed to possess. The more I thought about it, the more I realized how much this permeates all of our lives.

We’re not content to just look… we want beauty for ourselves.

I think this covetous instinct dates back to the beginning of time, but it astounds me how it has exploded in recent decades. It’s not just about buying; it’s about capturing. Why is it that half of us travel the world, seeing it all through a camera lens? Why is it that we record concerts and speeches and sermons? Why is it that when I see something beautiful in the shops, I feel such a desperate need to possess it?

Is it fear? Are we afraid that if we don’t hold on to things, the beauty will be lost? Why can we not just stop, look, appreciate and move on? There’s enough beauty to go round.

P.S. I wonder if I could go a whole year without taking a photo? Just a thought…

It’s not the worship songs that are the problem…

599799_56053393‘Yuck, she’s singing to God as though He’s her boyfriend!’

Have you ever felt this way, or had anyone else say this? I remember some years back going through a stage where my friends were heavily critical of any song sung to God, that could just as easily had the singer’s boyfriend or girlfriend’s name inserted into it.

As I’ve been doing some research lately though, on the messages our world sends to single people through music, I’ve begun to realize that maybe it’s not the worship songs that are the problem.

Here are some lyrics from popular love songs:

Ellie Goulding sings “I need your love. When everything’s wrong, you make it right.”

Alicia Keys croons “nothing in this whole wide world don’t mean a thing
If I ain’t got you with me baby”

And Whitney Houston says: “I have nothing… if I don’t have you.”

The great tragedy that all of these songs have in common, is that they’re putting a human relationship in a position of pre-eminence. They’re worshiping the created rather than the creator. They’re expressing that they have no greater need than the man in their life.

The problem is not that we insert God into this frame. The problem is that He was ever taken out in the first place.

How ‘gay’ is killing creativity

colorful-music-background-vector-illustration_53-14363

A while back I was horrified when one of my female students yelled across the classroom to one of the boys, ‘You should be gay!’ The boy, somewhat taken aback, asked her why.

‘Because you’re into music stuff and choir and all that,’ was her response, and a part of me cried inside for the ignorance and judgmental nature of teenagers.

A big part of my grief was this: that our incessant need to label people and define them by their sexuality is killing creativity in boys. Things that were praised in bygone eras, acting, music, composing and self expression through writing and poetry, have become defining symbol’s of a man’s sexuality. So many talented boys, growing into men, are afraid to express themselves lest their sexuality be called into question.

It is a tragedy for the arts, and a tragedy for humanity.

We’re reading To Kill a Mockingbird in year 11 at the moment, and Scout’s comment is really resonating with me: ‘I think there’s just one kind of folks. Folks.’

We need to stop defining people by their sexuality, and even more, we need to stop using these labels as a derogatory way to cut people down.

As Australians, we’re not great at celebrating talent, but we need to change that. Let’s start with letting boys be creative, lest we kill the passion of our future Mozarts, Shakespeares and Da Vincis.