Rubbish Christians Post on Facebook

UntitledI came across this the other day. I honestly can’t remember who posted it, (if it was you, I’m sorry) and I have no doubt the person meant well, but I really believe this stuff has got to stop.

It seems that Christians get far too caught up in liking and re-posting things that sound good, with little thought to whether or not they are true. Under the illusion that we are making a stand for what we believe in, we find ourselves merely propagating the idea that our faith is a house of straw that will be blown down with the first winds of reason.

As Christians, we are in possession of the greatest, deepest and purest redemptive truth the world has ever seen, and yet somehow we manage to reduce it to this sickening fluff.

How is it that the epic triumph of Jesus over evil can become glorified chain mail with a caricature devil and a spiritualised guilt trip?

Before you let yourself be guilted into ‘passing it on,’ ask yourself this: Does it do our saviour justice, and is it scriptural truth?

Because I can guarantee you this, the true army of God has the Word of God as its sword, and not some feel-good anecdote.

Advertisements

I love Social Media… or do I?

Apparently the emotions of love and hate are strongly related. I can see this in action in my feelings towards social media.

It’s tempting to say that I hate social media, but my actions betray me. If I dared blog about disliking it, I would be faced with an onslaught of friends crying ‘fraud!’ In fact the irony is obvious. I’m blogging about it. If I hate it, stop blogging!

ff7e6836af97118327bf303f4de4aba7So, I’ll have to face the truth: I love social media. Not all of it, but there’s no denying that Facebook has become an extension of my right hand or that there is now a filing cabinet on the creative side of my brain labelled ‘WordPress.’

So how can I simultaneously love and hate it? My ponderings have led me to this conclusion: Loving something too much can lead to obsession; as we obsess we hand power to the object of our obsessions. Even Nick Thompson, from Wired magazine said of the iPhone: “There are a lot of people who have a problematic relationship with these devices where the device becomes the master and they become the servant.”[1]

Somehow, by our own doing, this inanimate data, somewhere out in the ether, begins to control us. And so we do what humans have done for centuries with an object of obsession: We hate it. But we can’t destroy it, because it has a hold on us.

Do you ever worry about the hold that social media has on you?


[1] Thompson, Nick; in: Maushart, Susan. The Winter of our Disconnect. Profile Books, London. 2012